Freedom of Expression – A Joke – India’s Daughter Issue

Cross posted from Hindustan Times – who for some inexplicable reasons pull this article down (Second article they are pulling down in recent week). Banning a provocative Documentary is against freedom of  expression, yelled the folks in Main stream Media protagonists. But they stifle Anjali Bhushan’s freedom of Expression by pulling down her version on how the film, India’s Daughter Came about. It has been a litany of lies, deceit and mischief by the BBC Commissioned Hit job with Leslee Udwin playing the ball for them.

Before you read this, please go through what Nirbhaya’s friend who was with her that forgettable evening has to say about the movie. Reconfirms what I said earlier. India’s Daughter has lies & deceits written all over it. The link below takes you to the CNN-IBN Article. Backed it up, just in case they decide to take it down

Nirbhaya’s friend, who was with her on the fateful night, calls ‘India’s Daughter’ a fake film

Read on… the piece in Hindustan Times that was taken down.

Anjali Bhushan, co-producer of Indias’ Daughter, speaks out: Full statement

  • Anjali Bhushan
  • Updated: Mar 07, 2015 05:19 IST
In this file photo from December 22, 2012, protesters gather outside the presidential palace during a protest against the brutal gang rape of a 23-year-old woman on a moving bus in New Delhi. (AP Photo)

 

Make no mistake. Rape is a heinous crime. When public anger over the Nirbhaya incident boiled over, the question which confronted our society was how a human being could be driven to commit acts of such depravity. Although, it is said that the moral compass of all criminals is skewed the brutality of this incident made it necessary from a social viewpoint to examine the question of where such behaviour stems from.

The documentary “India’s Daughter” was therefore conceived to serve a social cause which was unfortunately overshadowed by the self-promoting agenda of my collaborator, Ms. Leslee Udwin. I had fallen out with her by the time that the principle photography of the film was completed and was conveniently excluded from the final edits. Subsequently, her attempt to exploit the subject matter of the documentary in a self-advancing attempt to sensationalize the content has not only brought disrepute to my profession and the country but also resulted in hurting the sentiments of the victims of rape who would invariably be exposed to the film. Granted editorial and journalistic privilege, there is also a particular sensibility that should be a guiding factor as an ethical standard. This is the same sensibility because of which the international media decides against telecasting the brutal immolation of a Jordanian pilot by terrorists. The social message which is the very essence of the film I wanted to make is now lost in the unfortunate controversy which has followed. When one edits several hours of footage, it is this sensibility, suitably deployed, which comes into play. It was this ‘sensibility’ which I was not able to exercise having been prevented by Ms. Leslee Udwin from participating in the post-assembly review of the film. And it was the lack of exercise of this ‘sensibility’ on her part, (having denied herself of my input as an Indian woman), in a cynical attempt to capture eyeballs and headlines which has led to the unfortunate controversy which will continue to cast a shadow on her career as a film maker.

The story does not end here. Regardless of her lack of sensibilities and judgment, Ms. Udwin knowingly and cynically breached the conditions and undertakings under which the permissions were granted. It was clear right at the outset that the permission to shoot the documentary was conditional upon the viewing of the unedited footage and the final cut by the authorities. Having completed the shooting, Ms. Udwin arrogantly refused to comply. On being shown snippets of the film, the authorities at Tihar Prisons had categorically stated that the comments of the convict were objectionable.  The authorities further asked for the full i.e. unedited film to be able to review the same in the proper context. It was reiterated that the film should not be released till it is approved by the prison authorities and the Ministry.

When Ms. Udwin categorically refuted this demand by Tihar Prisons, I was horrified especially since I had repeatedly pleaded with her to comply with all conditions and formalities. Ultimately, in September 2014, I received a letter from Ms. Udwin’s lawyers terminating our agreements. One of the grounds of termination was that my warnings had in fact led to the DG (Prisons) sending a legal notice to her company on the grounds of breach of permissions granted by the jail authorities!

Subsequently, when I accidently stumbled upon the fact that plans to release the documentary were afoot, I was both angry and surprised, since I had been informed that the BBC will not air the documentary until the Supreme Court hearings were over. I immediately proceeded to warn the media houses planning to telecast the film, both about the fact that permission to do so had not been received and also the fact that the matter was still sub judice.

That despite my warnings the documentary, which includes an abominable portrayal of the issue, was still aired is a sad reflection of the triumph of the personal ambition of a producer who valued publicity and international recognition over the social agenda of the entire production.

(This is the full statement of co-producer of controversial documentary “India’s Daughter”. Views expressed are personal)

The google cache of the piece here: (Click on the link)

Just in case it vanishes from the cache, here is the screenshot of the piece too

HT-Article-IndiasDaughter

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